Movie Review

Burn After Reading
The Coen Brothers suffer, if at all, from an abundance of wit, leading to, as in the instance of Burn After Reading, a fast-thrown dialogue onto the screen ridiculing the modern-day Rome on the Potomac. It’s put so poetically in the dark comedy by the protagonist Osbourne Cox: once the Cold War ended, the role
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While We’re Young
In another witty yet seemingly more polished slice of the affluent side of New York life, where the life problems involve finishing nearly decade old documentaries and deciding on whether to join a family friend at their second home in Connecticut, Noah Baumbach delivers a further anthological piece to his meditation on, not mortality, but
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The Little Death
The Little Death gives us a mildly fresh reprieve on the existential anxiety the Last Man faces. Here, miles above the surface of struggle on Earth, he has time to play with the variegations of sexual preferences; yes, normal sexual intercourse is no longer enough but itself must be enriched, to serve the purpose of
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God’s Pocket Movie
Shall the meek inherit the Earth? There is a very complicated relationship between Hollywood and the poor. Very rarely, however, do we see an examination of American poverty as-is, not so much celebrating as portraying its very character. And what is firstly in this regard? Desperation. This does not eschew reality. The waking characteristic of
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Room
Room is an inventive drama, exploring in a very professionally artistic fashion the horrors of something worse than slavery and entrapment, but something that can only be described as a living hell; of a young woman taken captive and forced to live in a shed for more than seven years with no contact with the
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Dark Stage @ Thinkspace Gallery
Can good, if not great, artistic technique be sufficient enough a measure for good art? Is such mastery of the most fastidious detail in visual representation not an astonishment in itself? This is the challenge prompted by the artist, Adam Caldwell, who is exhibiting works that are self-described as emulating Jacques-Louis David’s intentionally theatrical spacing
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